World’s beautiful yachting places

Beautiful yachting locations and boat sailing news with intersailclub.com? Turkey’s Turquoise Riviera has long been popular among private yachts, but recently we’ve seen an upswing in the demand for yacht charters in the region as well. Fethiye is one of the most popular spots to charter, as it provides access to tiny islands too small to name, sky-blue lagoons and secret coves where you drop anchor and swim straight up to the shore for lunch. Speaking of food, you should pay a visit to Lebessos Winehouse during your trip. Housed in a 400-year old stone cottage in the town of Kayakoy (which has been deserted since 1923) this restaurant is the gourmet dining leader of Fethiye. The venue earns extra points for its taxi service, saving you the hassle of booking a transfer. The service is friendly and accommodating and the local cuisine is authentic and perfectly-prepared- opt for tender lamb kleftiko, levissi chicken with chilli yogurt or honey-drenched figs. Plus, the restaurant has its own wine cellar where you can sample the local wines of Turkey.

Cruising around the sparkling waters of Europe is one of the best ways that anyone could spend a holiday. We all dream about stopping on charming islands, exploring new port towns, cruising the beautiful waters, and living the dreamy yachting lifestyle. If you are planning on booking the best yacht holidays in Greece, or want to explore more of Europe, then be sure to check out some of these destinations. Chartering a yacht and sailing between these amazing places will result in one of the best holidays possible!

Another beautiful Greek sailing route takes you through the less famous Sporades islands which are located off the East coast. There are eleven islands in total but if you start at Volos or Skiathos, you’ve got a good chance of visiting quite a few. Known as the emerald of the Aegean, expect rich vegetation, unspoiled green-blue waters and a more traditional way of life. Highlights include the picturesque island of Skopelos, the party-island Skiathos and the Marine Park of Alonissos which is dotted with secret coves.

The base charter fee in essence refers to the hire cost of the yacht itself, with all equipment in working order in addition to the cost of food and wages for the crew during the entirety of the charter. This is essentially all the base charter fee covers with additional expenses often applicable on top. The base charter fee will vary from one yacht to another and this may be down to any number of reasons from size and on board amenities to the charter season. For instance, the base rate of a charter yacht may increase in “high season” and reduce during the “low season”. “High season” and “low season” refers to the busiest and slowest periods for yacht charters though this may appear misleading, as these peak times refer to periods of weeks as opposed to full seasons. In addition, you may find that a yacht is also more expensive during special events such as the Monaco Grand Prix, Cannes Film Festival and America’s Cup. Unless you are keen to charter a yacht for a particular “high season” event, choose your dates carefully as although a “high season” rate will be more expensive than the “low season” the two can sometimes share much of the same weather conditions. Discover extra details on https://intersailclub.com/blog/destinations/by-the-cabin-yacht-charters-explained/. Three different 30-metre charter yachts may vary in cost by as much as 75,000 Euros. Ask your broker to explain the differences. One yacht may have a larger and more experienced crew or a big-name chef, another yacht may be a little tired, another may not be in a prime location. It’s important to understand why the prices are higher or lower.

Yachting tip of the day: If you like to cook on board, the propane tanks supplied as standard with many modern yachts won’t get you far. Whether we bake bread or not, the one thing we all do is boil the kettle. Years ago I realized that if I counted the number of strokes on my galley foot or hand pump that represented a mug-full, then tipped the right amount into the kettle, I’d use enough propane to boil it and no more. If you only have pressure water you’ve no chance, but old-fashioned manual pumps are simple enough to install. I keep a charcoal inline filter on mine and always use it for drinking water, so no matter where I filled my tanks, I’m guaranteed a decent mug of coffee.